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Placas, The Most Dangerous Tattoo

Monday, March 17th, 2014

“PLACAS: The Most Dangerous Tattoo” a play by Paul Paul S. Flores, directed by Michael John Garces and starring Ric Salinas of Culture Clash will go on a six city U.S. Tour this coming spring including dates with the GALA Hispanic Theatre in Washington, DC, Salinas, Laney College Theater in Oakland, Los Angeles Theater Center,Su Teatro in Denver and the Traveling Puerto Rican Theatre Company presented by Pregones in New York City.

Played by Ric Salinas from Culture Clash
Inspired by true events and in part in the life of Alex Sanchez  of Homies Unidos

Thursday April 3 Benefit event  after performance for Homies Unidos Q & A with cast and Alex Sanchez. To buy ticket for play and benefit event call Alex Sanchez for info. 213-793-1050 or follow link: Homies Unidos Benefit

Friday April 4 @ 6pm pre-performance conversation “Healing From Violence” with Father Greg Boyle, Jerry Tello and Alex Sanchez Saturday

April 5 post performance party and reception with cast and crew Sunday

April 6 @ 1pm Youth Voice for Change featuring youth presentations from Boyle Heights

 

For details on dates in each city, click on the website links below

Placas, The Most Dangerous Tattoo

 

Placas on Facebook

 

GALA Hispanic Theatre, Washington, DC
Friday – Saturday March 14-15
http://bit.ly/1mtvN4E

Alisal High School, Salinas, CA
Wednesday – Saturday March 19 – 22
www.brownpapertickets.com/event/603046

Laney College Theater, Oakland, CA
Wednesday – Saturday March 26-29
www.sfiaf.org/placas_2014

Los Angeles Theater Center, Los Angeles, CA
Thursday – Saturday April 3-6
www.thelatc.org

Su Teatro, Denver CO
Thursday – Sunday April 10-13
http://suteatro.org/201314-season/

Traveling Puerto Rican
Wednesday April 16
http://www.pregones.org/

Homies Unidos Invites you to a night of music and dancing in support of our incarcerated families.

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

English Information Below:

Homies Unidos les invita a una noche de música y diversión en apoyo a nuestra familias encarceladas. 

Homies Unidos y el Consulado de El Salvador les invita a una noche de música y diversión para apoyar la Asociación Salvadoreña De Apoyo a Privados De Libertad En El Exterior (ASAPLE) es una organización en El Salvador que aboga para los derechos humanos de familiares Salvadoreños detenidos en las prisiones de California. Homies Unidos se ha unido a coordinar el trabajo de la Directora de ASAPLE, Elisa Jurado en Los Ángeles.
Hay cientos de gente en las prisiones en California y muchos de ellos ya cumplieron sus sentencias, pero no los dejan salir, Unos se encuentran con enfermedades terminales y no reciben tratamiento apropiado, otros sufren violaciones de sus derechos humanos. La Sra. Elisa Jurado por más de ocho años ha estado luchando ganar la libertad de estos ciudadanos Salvadoreños.
En un crimen hay más de una víctima, la familia de la víctima y el victimario sufren el dolor de perder a su ser querido. Únanse con nosotros el sábado 4 de mayo y escuchen a Elisa Jurado y las historias de nuestras familias mientras recaudamos fondos apoyar este importante trabajo.

Central American Resource Center (CARECEN-LA)
2845 W. 7th St., Los Angeles, California 90005
6PM-12AM
$5 Donacion Minima
Checkes se pueden hacer a Homies Unidos Inc.
Baile, Comida y Bevidas estara diponible

ASAPLE SP

English: Homies Unidos Invites you to a night of music and dancing in support of our incarcerated families.
Homies Unidos and the Consulate of El Salvador invites you to a night of music and fun to support the Salvadoran Association in support of freedom deprived in the Exterior (ASAPLE) is an organization in El Salvador, which advocates for the rights of Salvadoran relatives incarcerated in the prisons of California. Homies Unidos has joined to coordinate the work of the Director of ASAPLE, Elisa Jurado in Los Angeles.
There are hundreds of people in prisons in California who have completed their minimum require sentences, but they continue in prison year after year, some are with terminal illnesses and do not receive appropriate treatment, others suffer violations of their human rights. Ms. Elisa Jurado for more than eight years has been fighting to win the freedom of these Salvadoran citizens.
There is more than one victim in a crime; the families of the victim and the aggressor suffer the pain of losing their loved one. Join us on Saturday, May 4 and listen to the stories of our families while we raise funds to continue the very important work of Elisa Jurado.

Central American Resource Center (CARECEN-LA)
2845 W. 7th St., Los Angeles, California 90005
6PM-12AM
$5 minimum donation
Checks can be made out to Homies Unidos Inc.
Dancing Food and beverages will also be available

ASAPLE EG copy

Vigil: Commemorating 100 Days of the Gang Truce In

Saturday, June 16th, 2012

Vigil: Commemorating 100 Days of the Gang Truce In 

El Salvador

mobilizeSunday, 17th 2012

CARECEN form 6PM to 8PM

Contact: Rodrigo Vasquez at 323-667-8297 

2845 West 7th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90005

Press Release

                                                        Press Kit

The Transnational Advisory Group In Support of the Peace Process in El Salvador invites all of you The commemoration of 100 days the gang truce has brought peace in our neighborhoods of El Salvador. Under skepticism and criticism, The gang members continue forward into a long term peace process.#

The gangs have made good will gestures to the community by declaring that the schools are now “Safe Zones” and no force recruitment will take place, to gain community support. Although this is not the answer that we would expect from our men and women who have been killing themselves over letters and numbers, this is a positive step forward as supporters of the peace process we ask for a total stop to all illicit activity. We cannot say that the zero tolerance initiatives pushed by the former president and continued by our current president in El Salvador has reduced violence because repression tactics have made this problem bigger. As such we need to understand that the gang members have been part of the problem, in so, they should be part of the solution.

The time is now to invest in our youth and bring economic development programs to El Salvador. Programs that will hire our youth who are living in poverty and stop our youth from joining gangs.

There have been over 700 deaths prevented since the truce started. So let’s give this historic gang truce a chance.

*Bring several candles*

  100 Days of Peace

Recent articles read here:

Peace Is Breaking Out Among Salvadoran Gang Members:

http://www.thenation.com/article/167875/peace-breaking-out-among-salvadoran-gang-members

Support Mounts for Salvadoran Gang Truce:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tom-hayden/salvadoran-gang-truce_b_1551638.html

Vigil for the 375 incarcerated people Killed in Honduran Prison

Friday, February 17th, 2012

Press Release
Contacts:
Alex Sanchez: (213)-383-7484 asanchez@homiesunidos.org
Walter Magana: (626)-500-3604 wmagana@homiesunidos.org

Vigil for the 375 incarcerated people Killed in Honduran Prison

WHAT: Organizations representing our community in human rights will have a vigil in front of the Consulate of Honduras denouncing the prison system in which prison guards participated in the death of more than 375 human beings in the prison of Comayagua, Honduras.

WHEN: Friday February 17th, 2012. 4pm
WHERE: Honduran Consulate of Los Angeles
3550 Wilshire Blvd #320
Los Angeles CA 90010
WHO: Speakers include:
- Policarpo Chaj, Mayavision
- Javier Staring, L.A. Archdiocese
- Union De Salvadorenos Estudiantes Universitarios(USEU)
- Alex Sanchez, Homies Unidos
- Ron Gochez, Union Del Barrio

Interviews available immediately following the press conference

WHY: Honduras for the third time is involved in human rights violations in the prisons of its country. On February 14, in the Comayagua prison in Honduras, more than 376 incarcerated people lost their lives in a fire within the prison. This has not been the first time; in 2003, 69 people were killed riddle with bullets and set on fire and 107 more in 2004 died in a fire in San Pedro Sula.

Homies United along other human rights organizations are outraged by this tactic on the part of Governments to solve the dilemma of violence affecting our countries in Central America. Every human being has their human right to live free of violence even if incarcerated.

We demand:
1. The Government put a Commission of non-governmental organizations to supervise the investigation.
2. That the Government will help affected families
3. the Government of the United States stop monetary aid until is stop human abuses and Zero Tolerance policies which has led to mass incarceration of our youth
4. A dismissal of all guards in the prison system of the Honduras including Security Minister Pompeyo Bonilla.

A weekend of solidarity with the indigenous people of El Salvador…In San Francisco

Monday, January 10th, 2011

A weekend of solidarity with the indigenous people of El Salvador…

Fri, Jan 14 – Hip Hop Concert
Sat, Jan 15 – Indigenous Dancers, speakers, food and community award ceremony
Sun, Jan 16 – Mayan Ceremony

Details below:

FRIDAY – January 14, 2011

- HIP HOP POR LA PAZ -

8:00pm-12:00pm

@ Women’s Building

3543 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94110

$10 donation

Performing:

Reyes del Bajo Mundo – O.N.S. El Sonador – Amazon Blew – Geo Kiburym – Rap Squad – Santos – Inner City Dwellers Conflikto Armado – El Comandante Izalco – Wanako – Kingz & Marmota Fu – Browny Loco – Lirico Dios

Also included:

Alex Sanchez-Executive Director of Homies Unidos live via Skype, – Homies Unidos Callejeros Graff & Visual Art – Coperativa Cuscatlán via www.ustream.com

TV Channel/Cooperative Cuscatlán Radio Subersivar – Cinema Feliciano Ama – Question Everythink  – Tigres Y Violetas  – El Jorge

SATURDAY – January 15, 2011

- SPIRIT OF MEMORY –

14TH Annual Commemoration of La Matanza

2:00pm – 7:30pm

@ Women’s Building

3543 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94110

$6 donation

After the tragic events of La Matanza in 1932, an unknown number of Salvadoran indigenous people perished, estimated between 10,000 and 30,000 people.  As a result, native communities in El Salvador took their ceremonies and culture into hiding.  78 years after these events, communities have re-emerged and are being recognized officially by El Salvador’s government.  We gather our collective Spirit of Memory with our Bay Area community and utilize it to discuss traditional culture and bi-nationality through discussion, song, and ceremonies.

Program:

Opening Prayer – JR Leywa, Wailaki, Round Valley Indian Reservation – Lenca-Poton Passage Song – Guanajuato Purepucha Dancers – Lenca Emplumado DancersFilm: ‘Discovering Dominga’

Presentations:

  • Julio Leyva—Comite de Izalqueños
  • Dra. Concepcíon Saucedo-Martinez, Comisión De La Verdad 1932
  • Dra. Robin Maria DeLugan, Assistant Professor-Anthropology, UC Merced

Community Honorees:

  • Miguel “Gavilan” Molina – KPFA Radio “La Onda Bajita”
  • Lizbett Calleros – Central American Resource Center (CARECEN)
  • Tory Canby, Teacher & Artist
  • Alejandra Calderon – former Executive Director, HOMEY

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Sunday, January 16, 2011 (9am)

- Mayan ceremony -

Conducted By: Pascual Yaxon Saloj & Maya Caqchiquel

@ Pine Lake Park – Sloat Blvd & Vale Avenue, San Francisco (by Stern Grove)

Free

************************************************************************************************************

Happy Holidays

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

Dear Friends,

As the New Year approaches I have reflected on the past 12 years since Homies Unidos first opened its office in Los Angeles with the dream of helping youth affected by war and gang violence.  We developed programs specifically for these youth hoping that they may find empowerment in positive action, the support to transition out of gangs and a platform to address and change the inhumane treatment of the immigrant community.

We have maintained our doors open to serve over 6,500 youth and their families from the Los Angeles Pico Union’s Central American community.  What, began as a dream has become a reality and today Homies Unidos stands as a nationally recognized organization at the forefront of gang violence prevention and intervention.

As we witnessed through this last election cycle, our immigrant communities have once again become the scapegoat and trigger point for political fear tactics and gangs have been framed as the scary poster child of this debate.  Over the past two years there has been a 23% increase in suppression in our immigrant community by ICE, FBI and local law enforcement agencies, leaving countless families separated from each other and children parentless.

With the assistance of your generosity, Homies Unidos has successfully developed exceptional programs to challenge the effects of this violence. The Epiphany Project, Libertad Con Dignidad and Family Wellness programs brings together youth and their parents, affected by gang violence or deportation, to advocate for their rights. Together we helped strengthen their ability communicate and improve their family relationship to over 130 family members this year.

“Homies Unidos has helped me change my life around and has giving me the opportunity to give back to other youth, I now volunteer in organizing the Art activities and outreaching to over 15 artist so far”, Said Juan Canizales, a former graduate of our Epiphany Project program.

We are convinced that through Epiphany Project classes we our helping to create a new generation of peacemakers committed to a building a better world. The process of those transitioning into a better life is not simple; after completing our 12 week program, graduates endure a minimum of 6-10 laser tattoo removal treatments to shed the last of their former lifestyles off their bodies.

In the past year, our ongoing programs have expanded and include a youth leadership and art program as an alternative to gang activity. We have developed these programs for inner-city youth and young adults as we also embark on a campaign to bring awareness of immigration and criminal justice issues affecting our community. Th e “Hip Hop for Peace” was launched on December 7, 2010 and will continue throughout 2011 with a series of events, bringing together local artist in music and art.

In these critical times, your support will greatly help in the success of our youth. Your ongoing support allows us to continue to provide our youth and their families with the skills and tools needed to overcome the obstacles they face in our community. As a non-profit organization, we rely on the generosity and compassion of our donors, like yourself, without whom we would not have the capacity to create peace in the schools, and keep families united in the community we serve. Please join us as a partner in making 2011 a better and more successful year for Homies Unidos.

Homies Unidos wishes you have a joyful holiday season,

Sincerely,                                                                                                                   Sincerely,

Alex Sanchez                                                                                                            Troy Garity                                                                              Executive Director                                                                                                Board Chair

‘Love in a Cemetery’ at the 18th St. Art Center

Friday, February 26th, 2010

The title of 18th Street Art Center’s ambitious group exhibition, “Love in a Cemetery,” comes from artist Allan Kaprow, who said, “Life in the museum is like making love in a cemetery.” Kaprow attempted to escape the museum’s sepulchral air with “happenings,” open-ended, participatory events that blurred the line between art and everyday life.

In this spirit, the exhibition presents works that take place within and outside the gallery, seeking to reevaluate the relationship between cultural institutions and the communities they serve. It succeeds, not so much in reinvigorating the gallery space, but in raising questions about how such works might best be presented within its walls.

Organized by curator Robert Sain and artist Andrea Bowers, the show is supposedly structured around a series of questions on the relationship between “cultural institutions” and “community,” both of which are ill-defined. People have scrawled various answers, ranging from glib to smart-alecky, in chalk on the walls of the gallery. Although broadly participatory, it’s the least compelling part of the show.

The rest of the pieces were created by Bowers and eight graduate students from the Public Practice Program at the Otis College of Art & Design. The students, in pairs or individually, teamed with five community organizations to create projects that would both have a positive impact on their respective communities and produce a work to be shown in the gallery.

Rodrigo Marti and Felicia Montes worked with gang intervention program Homies Unidos to develop art workshops, a panel discussion, and a poster and sticker campaign supporting the legal case of the program’s director, Alex Sanchez, who was indicted in a gang-related case in 2009. In the gallery, posters, fliers and protest signs line one of the walls and visitors can contribute to the cause by purchasing T-shirts, stickers and jewelry at a makeshift self-serve kiosk. The work successfully turns the gallery into an information and fundraising center, even if its traditional activist aesthetic — high contrast graphics, long columns of text and slapdash construction — loses some of its urgency on the gallery walls.

Less effective are the results of Rachael Filsinger and Ella Tetrault’s project with My Friend’s Place, a drop-in center for homeless youth in Hollywood. Filsinger and Tetrault ran workshops with the center’s young clients, encouraging them to record all the places they had lived or visited on conventional printed maps. Mounted on sheets of plywood, some of the maps are annotated with expressions of frustration or political conviction, but the scrawled lines and dots are often so cryptic that one can’t help feeling that the real work lies elsewhere. The maps are the byproduct of a process that hopefully has had some positive influence on its participants; it’s too bad we don’t know more about it.

Projects like these point to some of the difficulties of representing community-based work within the walls of the gallery. Should artists behave more like documentarians? Or should activism and art remain separate? On the other hand, is it enough to simply move the signs, T-shirts and stickers indoors?

Jamie Crooke’s partnership with the Hollywood Sunset Free Clinic provides one possible answer. Crooke walked the streets around the clinic pushing a cart selling health-related items–bandages, apples, wheat grass seed, Emergen-C packets — in exchange for a dollar or a bit of conversation. In addition to examining the cart itself, gallery visitors can watch a video and flip through a photo book documenting the project. The cart also features a price list including the above mentioned items as well as the cost of one year of employer-provided health insurance (about $13,000) and the annual compensation of United Health Group’s CEO (more than $9 million). With this sly, humorous gesture, the piece makes its critical point about inequities in healthcare spending, whether one sees it on the street or in the gallery.

It’s impossible to ascertain whether Crooke’s project had a greater impact than the rest; she simply presented it more thoughtfully. It is more than enough to go out and help others or fight injustice, but communicating that accomplishment — giving one’s vision a life beyond the immediate moment — is where the institution, whether a museum, an archive or, ahem, a newspaper, plays a role. Yes, the museum is often a mausoleum, housing the remnants of more vital activity, but how else will the rest of us know what happened?

18th Street Arts Center, 1639 18th St., Santa Monica, (310) 453-3711, through March 26. Closed Saturday and Sunday. www.18thstreet .org

Dignity Not Detentions

Friday, February 26th, 2010

Los Angeles advocates launch \'Dignity not Detention\' campaign in tandem with events around US